Lagos gas blast kills 15, destroys several buildings, Nigerian officials say

Lagos gas blast kills 15, destroys several buildings, Nigerian officials say

LAGOS (Reuters) – An explosion at a gas processing plant on Sunday killed at least 15 people and destroyed about 50 buildings after a fire broke out in a suburb of Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital, emergency services said.

The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) said the explosion was triggered after a truck hit some gas cylinders stacked in a gas processing plant near the corporation’s pipeline in Abule Ado area of Lagos state.

The impact of the explosion led to the collapse of nearby houses, damaged NNPC’s pipeline and caused the corporation to halt pumping operations on the Atlas Cove-Mosimi pipeline, the state-owned oil company said in a statement.

Several people were injured and taken to hospital, according to Ibrahim Farinloye, zonal coordinator for the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA).

Plumes of smoke billowed into the air as people watched, while firefighters tried to quench the flames, a Reuters witness said.

 Paramedics and security men observe a building that was damaged by the pipeline explosion at Abule Ado in Lagos, Nigeria, March 15, 2020. (Reuters Photo)

Paramedics and security men observe a building that was damaged by the pipeline explosion at Abule Ado in Lagos, Nigeria, March 15, 2020. (Reuters Photo)

Farinloye told Reuters that “the explosion destroyed over 50 residential houses.”

Pipeline fires in Nigeria, Africa’s biggest crude oil producer, are common and they are mostly caused by theft and sabotage. The methods used to steal oil often result in accidents that cause fires.

“The fire started with smoke,” one eyewitness said. “The smoke was coming up and later we heard a sound … and some houses collapsed even the roofs.”

NNPC said that the temporary shutdown of the petroleum products pipeline would not affect the normal supply of products to the Lagos and surrounding towns.

Reporting by Angela Ukomadu and Seun Sanni in Lagos; Camillus Eboh in Abuja; Writing by Chijioke Ohuocha, Editing by William Maclean and Alexandra Hudson

This article was previously published on Reuters

About author

Nigerians in South Africa
Nigerians in South Africa 6167 posts

We are about democracy, human rights, public opinion, political behavior, civil rights and policy aimed at improving the human condition, with a focus on African countries.

You might also like

What’s spreading faster than coronavirus in the US? Racist assaults and ignorant attacks against Asians

By Holly Yan, Natasha Chen and Dushyant Naresh, CNN Updated 8:56 PM ET, Thu February 20, 2020 Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. (CNN)In New York City, a man assaults a woman wearing a face mask, calli…

It is our own failure that led to load shedding

SACP general secretary Blade Nzimande says the tripartite alliance must take responsibility for recent load shedding.”The 1998 energy policy told us we needed to do certain things even in the early 2000s. We were told Eskom power stations must be maintained, must be renewed, we did not do that because we wanted to privatise. It’s…

Official: Pensacola shooter Saudi Arabian aviation student

Official: Pensacola shooter Saudi Arabian aviation student

0 Comments

No Comments Yet!

You can be first to comment this post!

Leave a Reply